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Jason Osborn is a Tax partner in the firm’s Washington DC office. He provides sophisticated transfer pricing and international tax advice to multinational clients in wide range of industries, including financial institutions, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, software, automotive, consumer products, energy and transportation.

Jason re-joined Mayer Brown in 2013 after holding transfer pricing-related positions with Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) from 2008-2012, initially as a team leader in the Advance Pricing Agreement (“APA”) Program and subsequently as a manager in the transfer pricing branch of the Office of Associate Chief Counsel (International). Leveraging this IRS experience, Jason brings to the table a unique and insider’s perspective in advising clients on complex transfer pricing matters and negotiating APAs. Prior to his IRS service, Jason was a senior Tax associate at Mayer Brown focused on transfer pricing matters.

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COVID-19 has sparked a seismic change in the workplace as many companies have found that working from home (“WFH”) has not diminished employee productivity and that employees prefer its greater flexibility. Given that—and the potential for saving on overhead costs—many companies have announced plans to adopt long-term WFH policies and close or realign office space. The OECD and several countries including the US, UK, Ireland, and Australia have issued guidance that excepts employees temporarily dislocated outside their employer’s country from creating unintended permanent establishments (“PE”)—but long-term WFH employees are not similarly excepted. The US, in particular, has thus far only officially extended PE protection for temporary dislocations of up to 60 calendar days that begin within the emergency period of February 1, 2020 through April 1, 2020.

While many employees that WFH do so from the same country as their employer, that is not always true, and so companies would be wise to perform their due diligence. To that end, this post analyzes some PE issues that a company should consider before it adopts a long-term WFH policy.


Continue Reading Work-From-Home Policies in the Post-COVID Era

On September 1, 2020, the IRS issued final regulations regarding the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”) codified in IRC §59A. These regulations finalize the proposed BEAT regulations published on December 6, 2019 with certain refinements. Among other guidance, the final BEAT regulations provide detailed rules that allow corporate taxpayers to waive deductions for purposes of BEAT. Although waiving deductions will likely result in additional tax costs, the waiver election may be an easier and less costly solution than the alternative of making substantive business model or supply chain changes to mitigate BEAT.

Continue Reading Waiving BEAT Deductions – The Smart Election for Multinational Taxpayers?

Responding to the potential disruption created by COVID-19 for transfer pricing arrangements, the Advance Pricing & Mutual Agreement (“APMA”) Program on May 11, 2020, issued informal guidance related to the pandemic. The guidance makes clear that APMA will consider the impact of COVID-19 on both pending requests and completed agreements. It also reveals that APMA is already discussing COVID-19 issues with treaty partners.

Continue Reading COVID-19 and APAs: APMA Signals Flexible Case-by-Case Approach to Address Special 2020 Transfer Pricing Challenges in APAs